These timepieces are works of art

Vacheron Constantin and the Louvre Museum in Paris unveiled The Métiers d’Art – Tribute to Great Civilisations series this week, introducing four new watches that are akin to art. The collection was presented to guests, who were invited for a private tour at the Louvre in Paris that houses the pieces.

The collection, with only five pieces per design available, is inspired by iconic art pieces at the Louvre, each representative of four great civilisations: the Persian Empire under Darius the Great; Egypt of the pharaohs from the time of the Middle Kingdom; the Hellenistic period in Greece; and the birth of the Roman Empire with the advent of Augustus.

Each watch offers a lesson in traditional craftsmanship, recreating the allure of artistic gems on a horological canvas. Surrounded by a frieze, the dial ornamentation is inspired by works in Le Louvre collections, depicting Roman mosaics, a painted Egyptian coffin, bas-relief Greek ceramics and vases, and a frieze featuring Babylonian-inspired bricks with coloured glaze.

The thematic watch designs include the Grand Sphinx de Tanis, an emblem of the Ancient Egyptian Empire, and the Lion de Darius that takes a cue from Persian Empire of the Achaemenids. The Victoire de Samothrace honours the Greek Antigonid dynasty, and the Buste d’ Auguste reflects on the Roman Empire of the Julio-Claudians.

The timepieces feature 42mm cases and are available in 18-karat pink and white gold. Inside, Vacheron Constantin’s self-winding 2460 G4/2 calibre movement powers the timepieces and delivers 28,800 vph (vibrations per hour), alongside a 40-hour power reserve.

The transparent sapphire crystal caseback offers a partial view of the mechanism inside, giving the wearer a peek into the horological wheels in motion.

Guests relished an exquisite buffet at the private men’s Automobile Club and a luxurious stay at Hôtel de Crillon, the suites of which have been renovated by Lebanese architect Aline Asmar d’Amman, in collaboration with Karl Lagerfeld.


Images courtesy of Vacheron Constantin